04/26/17
gardening challenge

Gardening Challenge Coming

Gardening Challenge Coming

A gardening challenge in the way of a very late and possibly hard freeze this weekend is headed to the Albuquerque area. The “average frost free date” for much of the time I have been here has hovered around April 15. Late freezes are not entirely unknown, however. We had a hard freeze in May of 2005. An Arrangement School was held at the same time as the Albuquerque Rose Show at the end of May. I still smile at the number of “Betty Boop” roses featured in rose arrangements that year, as well as in the show itself. That happened before we had rose photography in our rose shows. Floral photography does allow shows to thrive even with all the challenges of gardening.

This year, many of my roses have bloomed earlier than usual. However, I have a couple that I have babied that will be damaged by a hard freeze now. I’m also a little worried about the developing peaches and pears in my yard. I’ll keep an eye on the forecast and see what I can do to protect some of the plants.

Tim and Laurie, whom many of you know, face more difficult and frequent challenges in their gardening in Corrales, along the banks of the Rio Grande. However, once the freezes end in the spring, their property is full of lush floral growth.

These following images are from their yard in mid-May of 2016.

gardening challenge

Beautiful Climbing Roses

gardening challenge

Iris

gardening challenge

More Iris

gardening challenge

Even More Iris

gardening challenge

Even More Beautiful Iris

For those in the Albuquerque area, watch the weather forecasts. Good luck with your tender plants if the late hard freeze really happens.

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04/22/17
friends

Friends

Friends

“Friends are the siblings God never gave us” ~ Mencius

friends

“Friends” – Rose ‘Marmalade Skies’

Continuing a series of individual rose images, the rose featured today is the floribunda, ‘Marmalade Skies.’ It is capable of making large sprays, as well as blooms that briefly have the exhibition form of hybrid teas. The color is wonderful for rose arrangers. It definitely stands out across a room.

The roses in my yard are definitely ahead of schedule this year. I am enjoying them while they are blooming, because it may be fall before they have another good bloom cycle.

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04/20/17
rose distant drums

A Garden to Walk In

A Garden to Walk In

A garden to walk in…The roses in my yard are about three weeks ahead of time this year, compared to when I first came to Albuquerque. I’m definitely enjoying them now. This rose is a shrub rose, ‘Distant Drums.’ It has a wonderful fragrance, along with unique color.

rose distant drums

‘Distant Drums’

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04/19/17
Route 66

Route 66 In Albuquerque

Route 66 in Albuquerque

Route 66 in Albuquerque may make you think of many things. In addition to “those”things, “Route 66″is a shrub rose that can be spectacular in early spring. The color, when fresh, is dark mauve, and the bloom has bright golden stamens. Another plus for this rose is a fabulous scent. It blooms intermittently throughout the summer. It is at its most glorious at its first bloom. An added bonus here is a little Lady Bug.

Route 66

Shrub Rose “Route 66”

Route 66

“Route 66” with Lady Bug

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03/13/17
rose photography

Rose Photography in the ARS

Rose Photography in the American Rose Society: Results of the 2016 ARS Digital Photography Contest

Rose photography in the American Rose Society has a growing interest, no pun intended. 🙂 The American Rose Magazine has had a photography contest for some time. In recent years, the contest has become a digital competition. Online entry is easy, and mailed CD’s, DVD’s, and thumb drives are also accepted. Yesterday, March 12, the ARS used online methods to announce the winners of the 2016 competition. Not only was it fun, but all of the winners could be shown. While the top winners will appear in the American Rose Magazine, print space does not allow for the showing of all winners.

I was very happy to win the Judges Class with ‘Hot Cocoa,’a floribunda rose grown by my mother and photographed by me. ‘Hot Cocoa’ is a russet rose, and russet is always a challenge to photograph!

rose photography

Floribunda Rose ‘Hot Cocoa.’ Winner of the Judges Class, 2016 American Rose Society Digital Photography Contest

A very big winner in the regular classes is the fourth, and newly appointed, PSWD Photography Chair, Juanita Ortega. I remember when Juanita was just beginning rose photography. She won awards with gorgeous images taken with a point-and-shoot camera and no editing software. (I also remember when she was just beginning in Arrangements.) She brings knowledge, dignity, and commitment to PSWD photography, and the PSWD is lucky to have her. Yesterday I lost track of all of her awards, but you can see all of them in this YouTube video, along with all of the other winners. A brief introduction is followed by all of the winners in all of the classes. Enjoy!

The rules for the 2017 ARS Digital Photography Contest have already been posted. Think about entering.

Rose show season is rapidly approaching, and the emphasis will move to rose photography in print form. Some people say entering a print is too expensive, referring to having it mounted and matted somewhere. Last year I prepared a short “how-to”in Kindle form. I show not only how to do it easily, but also how to do it inexpensively. More than that, this method eliminates all the “waves” frequently seen in some of the images in our rose shows.

The American Rose Society now offers a variety of options and settings for sharing your rose images.

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03/8/17
garlic

“Garlic” a Nominee in 10th Annual International Color Awards

“Garlic” Honored in the 10th Annual Color Awards

Garlic is not only wonderful in food, it can be great fun to photograph. Some types produce “scapes,”which visually are quite interesting. I made this photograph at the Tucson Botanical Gardens in May, 2015. I was in Tucson for a seminar to update my credentials as an American Rose Society Accredited Horticulture Judge, but I took time to visit the botanic gardens. This is only one of many photographs I took that day.

Garlic

Garlic

I was notified today that the image was a Nominee in the 10th Annual International Color Awards, in the Still Life Category. Some of you who read here regularly may recall seeing it before. It was juried into the 2015 Corrales Fine Arts Show, where I showed it on metal.

The Press Release

I thank the International Color Awards and the jurists for this year.

Google has a lot of different images of these scapes.

garlic

“Garlic”- 10th Annual International Color Awards Nominee

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03/4/17
house finch

House Finch in Breeding Plumage

House Finch in Breeding Plumage, on Rose ‘Mermaid’

house finch

House Finch in Breeding Plumage, on Rose ‘Mermaid’

The house finch is a very common backyard bird here in Albuquerque. During breeding season, the males take on a much more colorful plumage. This guy seems pretty pleased with himself.

He is sitting on a branch of ‘Mermaid,’ a hybrid bracteata introduced in the US in 1918. Regular readers will recognize it as one of my favorite roses. I have hung a cylinder feeder near it, and any birds hang out on ‘Mermaid’ as they wait their turn at the feeder.

Roses are beginning to leaf out. ‘Mermaid’ is the one rose I cut back in the fall, for reasons I have explained multiple time over the years on this blog. So, I can just watch it leaf out and then bloom a little later.

The other roses, however, are leafing out a little earlier than I would like, and I will be pruning them soon. Hopefully, it will be safe… One year, before I knew anything about roses in Albuquerque, I pruned in February! I had one of the best spring blooms ever that year! But, I also recall 2005, when I pruned in early April and did not fertilize until late April. We got a hard freeze in May, which pretty much wiped out the spring bloom here. That was a freak occurrence, but in the time of climate change, who knows?

Nevertheless, I am ready to begin pruning roses, and will hope for the best.

I will also enjoy the birds that come to the yard. 🙂

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02/8/17
2017 ANMPAS

2017 ANMPAS in April

2017 ANMPAS: “Fruit of Ancient Myths”

2017 ANMPAS – Annual New Mexico Photographic Art Show – will open with a reception on April 1 and run through Sunday, April 23, 2017. The show will be held in the Fine Arts Building at EXPONM, the State of New Mexico Fairgrounds.

This April I am pleased to be showing “Fruit of Ancient Myths” as a 16×20″ print. I thank the 2017 jurists.

2017 ANMPAS

2017 ANMPAS – “Fruit of Ancient Myths”

The Annual New Mexico Photographic Art Show features photographic artists who are residents of New Mexico. Accepted entries have gone through a rigorous jury process. LeRoy Perea began ANMPAS as a way for photographers in New Mexico to showcase their work in a gallery setting. Begun as one show each year, it rapidly expanded to two shows a year, and may, at some point, reach three. Until 2017, the “main” ANMPAS show was held in December. Ïnsight New Mexico” for women photographers was added in April several years ago. In December of 2016, things were mixed to add variety. The December show was a pure black and white show. The main 2017 ANMPAS show will be held in April. I do not yet know what the show in December will feature.

You might be wondering, “why is this on a gardening site?” I began this site years ago about growing roses. Over time, I became interested in photographing roses, which led to the PSWD Guidelines for Judging Rose Photographs. My interest in photography has branched into many areas, but I still enjoy pushing the envelope with botanicals. These pomegranates were grown by my mother. I photographed them – many of them – for the conceptual series, “Persephone’s Choice.” Now I am taking time to enjoy the pomegranates themselves, apart from the conceptual series.

For those of you in the Albuquerque area, I hope you’ll visit 2017 ANMPAS this April.

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02/2/17
spring and roses

Spring and Roses Are Coming

Spring and Roses Are Coming!

Spring and roses are coming, as this current warm spell reminds us. Although it is tempting to prune roses now, it is far too early. However, this is a great time to do some clean-up in the garden. The last cooler spell, along with the wind, removed most of the remaining leaves on my rose bushes. I can see crossing canes better now, and ones that need to be removed. I did a lot of that yesterday, but not pruning.

While waiting for this year’s roses, as well as other flowers and plants, I’m going to share some from prior years. I’m ready for spring:

spring and roses

Ambridge Rose, a David Austin Shrub Rose

spring and roses

Miniature rose, ‘Climbing Earthquake’

spring and roses

Old Garden Rose, Hybrid bracteata 1918
Mermaid

spring and roses

Miniature Rose ‘Marriotta.’

spring and roses

Rose ‘Gold Medal’ with Hair Streak Butterfly. Winner of the Judges Class, 2015 ARS American Rose Photography Competition.

I had multiple winners in the 2014 Fall National, but I’ll show two here, Queen and King.

spring and roses

Spray of ‘Dream Weaver,’ Queen of Show in Photography at the 2014 ARS Fall National

Spring and roses

“Gemini” – Creative Interpretation
King of Show in Photography, ARS 2014 Fall National Convention
Best of Show in Photography, Albuquerque Spring 2014 Rose Show

For those of you planning to enter photographs in ARS sanctioned rose shows with the requirement for images matted and mounted to 11×14 specifications, I have prepared a short “how to do it inexpensively and quickly” in Kindle format, which can be read on any device with the free Kindle app. It costs $0.99, the lowest price Amazon would allow me to offer it.

I’m looking forward to Spring and Roses!

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09/22/16

World CML Day, Celebrating Life

World CML Day – A Reason to Celebrate

World CML Day celebrates the beauty of life.

World CML Day

World CML Day. Rose ‘Misty Moonlight’

The rose is ‘Misty Moonlight,’ my registered (2004) large-flowered climber.

CML – chronic myelogenous leukemia – is a blood cancer and a Rare Disease; by definition, less than 200,000 in the US living with it. Today, slightly less than 50,000 in the US live with CML, with around 5,000 diagnosed each year. CML is caused by a translocation of chromosomes 9 and 22, which is how 9/22 came to be recognized as World CML Day. This leukemia is the first cancer to be successfully treated (not cured; that has not happened yet) with targeted therapies, in this case the tyrosine kinase inhibitors, TKI’s for short.

How the Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors Came to Be

This progress required the work of many people in many seemingly unrelated fields over many years. The Watson-Crick double helix model for the structure of DNA, published in 1953, was the great scientific discovery of the 20th Century.

The first direct link between chromosomal abnormalities to any malignancy came with the discovery of the Philadelphia Chromosome (the 9/22 translocation) in 1960 by Peter Nowell at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine and David Hungerford from the Fox Chase Cancer Center’s Institute for Cancer Research.

Janet Rowley in 1972 discovered the Bcr-Abl oncogene produced by the translocation, which produces the tyrosine kinases thought to be responsible for the uncontrolled growth of white blood cells in CML.

In the early 1990’s Dr. Brian Druker began working with Dr. Nicholas Lydon, of what is now Novartis, for the development and testing of tyrosine kinase inhibitors. By the late 1990’s, one in particular, now known as imatinib (Gleevec) showed almost miraculous results for Dr. Druker’s patients, many of whom are still alive after beginning the drug in clinical trials. Novartis did not want to bring the drug to market because they didn’t think there would be enough demand for the drug to be profitable. Dr. Druker led the fight to make the drug available to his patients (and today fights against price gouging). He will forever be a hero to CML patients and their families.

Timeline for development of TKI’s.

PCR Testing

Drug resistance can occur, along with new mutations. A variety of TKI’s have been developed since Gleevec was FDA approved in 2002, helping to address the problem of drug resistance.

Patients are followed closely for evidence of resistance and recurrence through PCR (polymerase chain reaction) monitoring. This process for rapid DNA replication was discovered by Dr. Kary Mullis, and in 1993 he was awarded the Nobel Prize for it. PCR is used for many, many things, and any of you who have had your DNA tested, looking for where your ancestors began and how they migrated, etc., had PCR testing.

I share this video once again, because it proves that science can be fun, and can be presented in a way interested people can understand.

9/22 – World CML Day, my second year not only to observe it but to even know what CML is. I post with respect and gratitude to everyone who has contributed to changing CML from a short-term death sentence to the potential for an essentially normal life, well lived.

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