07/17/17
spring and roses

ARS Photo Competitions, Creative Interpretation

This entry is part 2 of 5 in the series Rose Photography

ARS Photo Competitions, Creative Interpretation

ARS photo competitions, creative interpretation: the American Rose Society Board gave temporary approval for Guidelines for Judging Rose Photography in 2015. The Board approved a revision in 2016. This PowerPoint is one of several I will be posting here over the next few months to give our members examples of images I have created of the various Classes following the Guidelines. I would like to encourage interested rosarians to photograph roses, including creating some “rose art” images, and enter them in ARS shows, including local, district, and national shows; the ARS Digital Photography competition; and the ARS Calendar competitions.

Views presented here are my own, but I believe the images conform to the current Guidelines. Photography in the ARS is a work in progress, so do not be surprised if over time the Guidelines change. The current Guidelines should be applicable at least through the 2018 ARS National Convention and Rose Show.

ARS photo competitions, creative interpretation

Rose ‘Gold Medal’ with Hair Streak Butterfly. Winner of the Judges Class, 2015 ARS American Rose Photography Competition.

Logged in users at this site may download and share (including posting on websites) the PowerPoint for use for educational purposes, as long as a credit line is given. I have also posted this PowerPoint in the dedicated page for such presentations. This PowerPoint is sized for web and digital device presentation. Please note that this may be viewed in Full Screen mode by clicking on the icon at the lower right corner of the presentation. If anyone needs a higher resolution file, please contact me through the Contact page.

Finally, the American Rose Society has more information about many aspects of roses at their website.

07/16/17
floral arrangement photography

ARS Photo Competitions, Floral Arrangements

This entry is part 3 of 5 in the series Rose Photography

ARS Photo Competitions, Floral Arrangements

ARS photo competitions, floral arrangements: the American Rose Society Board gave temporary approval for Guidelines for Judging Rose Photography in 2015. The Board approved a revision in 2016. This PowerPoint is one of several I will be posting here over the next few months to give our members examples of images I have created of the various Classes following the Guidelines. I would like to encourage interested rosarians to photograph roses, including floral arrangements, and enter them in ARS shows, including local, district, and national shows; the ARS Digital Photography competition; and the ARS Calendar competitions.

Views presented here are my own, but I believe the images conform to the current Guidelines. Photography in the ARS is a work in progress, so do not be surprised if over time the Guidelines change. The current Guidelines should be applicable at least through the 2018 ARS National Convention and Rose Show.

ARS photo competitions, floral arrangements

Traditional Mass Design by Debi Harrington

Logged in users at this site may download and share (including posting on websites) the PowerPoint for use for educational purposes, as long as a credit line is given. I have also posted this PowerPoint in the dedicated page for such presentations. This PowerPoint is sized for web and digital device presentation. If anyone needs a higher resolution file, please contact me through the Contact page.

Finally, the American Rose Society has more information about many aspects of roses at their website.

07/14/17
rose photography

ARS Photo Competitions, Rose Sprays

This entry is part 4 of 5 in the series Rose Photography

ARS Photo Competitions, Rose Sprays

ARS photo competitions, rose sprays: the American Rose Society Board gave temporary approval for Guidelines for Judging Rose Photography in 2015. The Board approved a revision in 2016. This PowerPoint is one of several I will be posting here over the next few months to give our members examples of images of the various Classes I have created following the Guidelines. I would like to encourage interested rosarians to photograph roses and enter them in ARS shows, including local, district, and national shows; the ARS Digital Photography competition; and the ARS Calendar competitions.

Views presented here are my own, but I believe the images conform to the current Guidelines. Photography in the ARS is a work in progress, so do not be surprised if over time the Guidelines change. The current Guidelines should be applicable at least through the 2018 ARS National Convention and Rose Show.

ARS photo competitions, rose sprays

Mounted and Matted Spray of ‘Dreamweaver’

Logged in users at this site may download and share (including posting on websites) the PowerPoint for use for educational purposes, as long as a credit line is given. I have also posted this PowerPoint in the dedicated page for such presentations.

Finally, the American Rose Society has more information about many aspects of roses at their website.

07/14/17
ARS photo competitions

ARS Photo Competitions: Fully Open Roses

ARS Photo Competitions: Fully Open Roses

ARS photo competitions continue to grow in many parts of the country. The American Rose Society Board gave temporary approval for Guidelines for Judging Rose Photography in 2015. The Board approved a revision in 2016. This PowerPoint is one of several I will be posting here over the next few months to give our members examples of images of the various Classes I have created following the Guidelines. I would like to encourage interested rosarians to photograph roses and enter them in ARS shows, including local, district, and national shows; the ARS Digital Photography competition; and the ARS Calendar competitions.

Views presented here are my own, but I believe the images conform to the current Guidelines. Photography in the ARS is a work in progress, so do not be surprised if over time the Guidelines change. The current Guidelines should be applicable at least through the 2018 ARS National Convention and Rose Show.

ARS photo competitions rose photography

Miniature rose, ‘Child’s Play,’ fully open, stamens showing
Blue Ribbon and Best of Section, Fully Open Roses, 2014 ARS Fall National Rose Show and Convention

Logged in users at this site may download and share (including posting on websites) the PowerPoint for use for educational purposes, as long as a credit line is given. I have also posted this PowerPoint in the dedicated page for such presentations.

Finally, the American Rose Society has more information about many aspects of roses at their website.

06/23/17
rose photography

Rose Photography: Fully Open, Stamens Showing

This entry is part 1 of 5 in the series Rose Photography

Rose Photography: Fully Open, Stamens Showing

Rose photography has been an ongoing interest and sometimes a lot of hard work since 2008. Between 2008 and 2012, in addition to working on developing guidelines for judging rose photographs in rose shows, I had an educational website and blog, “PSWD Photography.” That was not carried forward under new leadership in 2012, and I had other things to do.

Recently, friends and acquaintances who are not judges, and some of whom are also not exhibitors, have asked how to do rose photography under the guidelines. Some would like to enter photographs in the 2018 ARS National in San Diego in October of 2018, and have asked for guidance. I decided to do a series on some of the different classes, using my own photographs as examples. This is not any kind of official statement, simply my interpretation of the Guidelines as I photograph my roses. This first pdf is on the class, “Fully Open, Stamens Showing.” I hope you enjoy it and find it useful.

To view the pdf, LEFT CLICK on this link: Rose Photography for ARS Shows: Fully Open, Stamens Showing (A right click will not work; a left click will display the entire pdf for you to scroll through.)

The pdf is also available in PowerPoint form, which I am willing to make available to rosarians wishing to use it for teaching/presentation purposes.

Look for other classes such as “Sprays” and others in the future as I have time.

The best way to learn your camera and roses is to photograph, photograph, photograph. It is also a great way to have fun!

rose photography

Miniature rose, ‘Child’s Play,’ fully open, stamens showing
Blue Ribbon and Best of Section, Fully Open Roses, 2014 ARS Fall National Rose Show and Convention

05/28/17
Susan Brandt Graham

2017 PSWD Photography Judge Award

2017 Pacific Southwest District Outstanding Rose Photography Judge Award

The 2017 PSWD Outstanding Rose Photography Judge Award was a huge, but welcome, surprise to me. With many thanks to all of the people responsible for this honor!

2017 Photography Judge Award Susan Brandt Graham Photography: Spring 2017 Roses &emdash;

I began work in the PSWD in 2008 to develop guidelines for judging rose photographs in our rose shows. I was already an ARS Accredited Horticulture and Arrangements Judge. But because I did not want to feel I was “shooting from the hip” in working for rose photographs in rose shows, I did UNM CE’s entire program in Digital Photography. I wanted to feel and to be competent for the task I set for myself. In 2012, the ARS recognized rose photography and set up a new committee to work on guidelines. It has been an honor to work with that national committee to establish working guidelines at the national level. It has been gratifying to see much of my work from the PSWD level incorporated into the guidelines at the national level.

The citation was read by Juanita Ortega, current Chair of Photography for the PSWD, at the District Convention, April 22, 2017:

The recipient of this award is an American Rose Society Accredited Horticulture and/or Arrangement Judge who has advanced the exhibition of rose photographs at local and district rose shows in the Pacific Southwest District. By encouraging rosarians to photograph their roses, our societies have attracted more members and contributed to the enjoyment of our national flower by the public.

This year, we recognize the efforts of one of the founders of this newest division of American Rose Society Rose Shows. For many years, she organized seminars and classes to teach interested ARS members the basics of photographing and displaying roses. She organized Rose Photography Divisions at national, district and local rose shows. This Photography Judge served on the American Rose Society Photography Guidelines Committee from 2012 through 2015.

The 2017 Pacific Southwest District Outstanding Rose Photography Judge Award is presented to Dr. Susan Brandt Graham from Albuquerque, New Mexico.

Many thanks, Juanita, to you and the photographers of the PSWD. ~ Susan

05/22/17
spring 2017 roses

Spring 2017 Roses

Spring 2017 Roses

Spring 2017 Roses is a small collection of images of roses mainly grown by me. ‘Austrian Copper,’ the species rose R. foetida bicolor, was grown by Tim and Laurie Price. If you wish to see any of the images at a larger size, click on the image.
You may also watch a slideshow containing these and other images.
Additional post will be made throughout the season.
I hope you enjoy the varied beauty of the roses.

Miniature Rose, ‘Incognito,’ after a gentle overnight rain
Susan Brandt Graham Photography: Spring 2017 Roses &emdash; Rose 'Incognito'

Species Rose, R. foetida bicolor, grown by Tim and Laurie Price
Susan Brandt Graham Photography: Spring 2017 Roses &emdash; Rose 'Austrian Copper'

Spray of shrub rose, ‘Route 66’
Susan Brandt Graham Photography: Spring 2017 Roses &emdash; Rose 'Route 66'

Spray of miniature rose, ‘Bees Knees’
Susan Brandt Graham Photography: Spring 2017 Roses &emdash; Rose 'Bees Knees'

Shrub rose, ‘Pike’s Peak’
Susan Brandt Graham Photography: Spring 2017 Roses &emdash; Rose 'Pike's Peak'

Shrub rose, ‘Othello’
Susan Brandt Graham Photography: Spring 2017 Roses &emdash; Rose 'Othello'

Miniature rose, ‘Spring Fling’
Susan Brandt Graham Photography: Spring 2017 Roses &emdash; Rose 'Spring Fling'

Floribunda rose, ‘Betty Boop.’ Rose shows now frequently have a class for “Rose Art,” and very often what you will see are images that use photoshop filters or other editing that leads to the destruction or loss of beauty of the rose itself. I want to show that images can be greatly edited, and/or enhanced, without destroying the integrity or the beauty of the rose.
Susan Brandt Graham Photography: Spring 2017 Roses &emdash; Rose 'Betty Boop'

03/13/17
rose photography

Rose Photography in the ARS

Rose Photography in the American Rose Society: Results of the 2016 ARS Digital Photography Contest

Rose photography in the American Rose Society has a growing interest, no pun intended. 🙂 The American Rose Magazine has had a photography contest for some time. In recent years, the contest has become a digital competition. Online entry is easy, and mailed CD’s, DVD’s, and thumb drives are also accepted. Yesterday, March 12, the ARS used online methods to announce the winners of the 2016 competition. Not only was it fun, but all of the winners could be shown. While the top winners will appear in the American Rose Magazine, print space does not allow for the showing of all winners.

I was very happy to win the Judges Class with ‘Hot Cocoa,’a floribunda rose grown by my mother and photographed by me. ‘Hot Cocoa’ is a russet rose, and russet is always a challenge to photograph!

rose photography

Floribunda Rose ‘Hot Cocoa.’ Winner of the Judges Class, 2016 American Rose Society Digital Photography Contest

A very big winner in the regular classes is the fourth, and newly appointed, PSWD Photography Chair, Juanita Ortega. I remember when Juanita was just beginning rose photography. She won awards with gorgeous images taken with a point-and-shoot camera and no editing software. (I also remember when she was just beginning in Arrangements.) She brings knowledge, dignity, and commitment to PSWD photography, and the PSWD is lucky to have her. Yesterday I lost track of all of her awards, but you can see all of them in this YouTube video, along with all of the other winners. A brief introduction is followed by all of the winners in all of the classes. Enjoy!

The rules for the 2017 ARS Digital Photography Contest have already been posted. Think about entering.

Rose show season is rapidly approaching, and the emphasis will move to rose photography in print form. Some people say entering a print is too expensive, referring to having it mounted and matted somewhere. Last year I prepared a short “how-to”in Kindle form. I show not only how to do it easily, but also how to do it inexpensively. More than that, this method eliminates all the “waves” frequently seen in some of the images in our rose shows.

The American Rose Society now offers a variety of options and settings for sharing your rose images.

02/2/17
spring and roses

Spring and Roses Are Coming

Spring and Roses Are Coming!

Spring and roses are coming, as this current warm spell reminds us. Although it is tempting to prune roses now, it is far too early. However, this is a great time to do some clean-up in the garden. The last cooler spell, along with the wind, removed most of the remaining leaves on my rose bushes. I can see crossing canes better now, and ones that need to be removed. I did a lot of that yesterday, but not pruning.

While waiting for this year’s roses, as well as other flowers and plants, I’m going to share some from prior years. I’m ready for spring:

spring and roses

Ambridge Rose, a David Austin Shrub Rose

spring and roses

Miniature rose, ‘Climbing Earthquake’

spring and roses

Old Garden Rose, Hybrid bracteata 1918
Mermaid

spring and roses

Miniature Rose ‘Marriotta.’

spring and roses

Rose ‘Gold Medal’ with Hair Streak Butterfly. Winner of the Judges Class, 2015 ARS American Rose Photography Competition.

I had multiple winners in the 2014 Fall National, but I’ll show two here, Queen and King.

spring and roses

Spray of ‘Dream Weaver,’ Queen of Show in Photography at the 2014 ARS Fall National

Spring and roses

“Gemini” – Creative Interpretation
King of Show in Photography, ARS 2014 Fall National Convention
Best of Show in Photography, Albuquerque Spring 2014 Rose Show

For those of you planning to enter photographs in ARS sanctioned rose shows with the requirement for images matted and mounted to 11×14 specifications, I have prepared a short “how to do it inexpensively and quickly” in Kindle format, which can be read on any device with the free Kindle app. It costs $0.99, the lowest price Amazon would allow me to offer it.

I’m looking forward to Spring and Roses!

09/9/16

Rose Blooms Not of Exhibition Quality

This entry is part 1 of 1 in the series Rose Photography for Rose Shows

Rose Blooms Not of Exhibition Quality – Can Photographers Do Anything with Them?

rose blooms

Great Form! Major color faults and not disbudded!

Rose blooms of less than exhibition quality sometimes have some features that photographers enjoy and/or find challenging. Photographs of such rose blooms are not a problem outside of ARS (American Rose Society) shows. However, in the horticultural photography classes in ARS shows, photographs of imperfect specimens are no more welcome than the actual specimen would be. Does this mean the photographer should just “walk on by” and not “stop to smell the roses?” Each person has to answer that question for him/herself. I would like to suggest some ways to enjoy these roses, and perhaps also create an image people enjoy and can be entered in ARS shows.

First and foremost, photographing any and all rose blooms is one way to work on photography skills. You can try different camera settings, explore different lighting conditions, learn if you personally prefer photographing cut specimens or specimens growing in the garden. For entry in ARS shows, all specimens must be outdoor garden grown. Photographs for shows may be of either cut specimens or specimens still growing in the garden. The more you photograph roses, the better you will become as a photographer and the more you will know your own preferences. You will develop your own “style.” Other people may recognize it before you do.

First Example

ARS members may access the Guidelines for Judging Rose Photography here.

One Class is

One Spray: Two or more blooms, any type of rose of Hybrid Tea, Grandiflora, Miniature, Miniflora, or
Floribunda classifications of roses. This class does NOT include collections.

Photography judges not infrequently encounter collections of roses, rather than sprays. When detected, these are not judged.

When I plan to show a photograph of a rose spray, I usually try to show the origin of the entire spray. That is personal preference and certainly not required. For illustration, this is a spray of ‘Dream Weaver.’

Spray of Rose Dream Weaver

Spray of ‘Dream Weaver’

Not too long ago I was photographing Veterans’ Honor. At first glance, what I took to be a spray, turned out to be a spray of two blooms and a stem with one bloom. I liked the flow and the rhythm of the collection but could not enter it as a “Spray.”

One of my favorite Classes is

Creative Interpretation
The photograph should evoke a sense of originality and a new and different way of imagining the rose or roses with the mind’s eye. This may include processes used to alter the original image such as colorizing, texturing, dodging, burning, dithering, painting, shadowing, blurring, layering, cloning, filtering, merging, cropping. Color, Black & White, Sepia, or combinations of these are permitted in this class. Photo enhancement software is permitted in this class.

In this class, pretty much anything goes, which is one reason I like it. The collection of Veterans’ Honor could be shown in this class, no problem. My personal preference in my own work is to try to maintain the beauty of the rose when I make alterations using software. That is by no means a requirement for this class, but it is what I personally try to do.

I decided to create a black and white image. Those of you who work with digital black and white know that there is no single “Black and White.” I wanted something soft and gentle, almost with an old fashioned look. Although the roses may appear to be in a vase, I photographed them on the bush, growing close to the back wall of my house. I was satisfied with the outcome.

rose blooms

A Collection, Not a Spray

Second Example

Another Class is

One bloom.
One bloom, no side buds, of Hybrid Tea, Grandiflora, Miniature, Miniflora, or Floribunda classifications of roses.

These are the exhibition form roses people tend to think of when they think of “rose.” Judges have specific guidelines for judging specimens in the horticultural portion of a rose show, and those same judging points count for 40% of the score of a photograph of one bloom of a rose. Form is extremely important in this class. This is a rose with great form, but it has just a few problems. 🙂

Roses are on the market that are visually similar to the one at the top of this post. However, this bloom should be solid red. The pink/white is a color fault, a major color fault. Judges would severely penalize this bloom. As if that were not enough, this rose has not been disbudded. You can clearly see the side bud in the lower left. The color fault and side bud are the two biggest problems here, but some judges would also deduct points for the rain drops. Rain drops personally do not bother me, but knowing how some judges view them, I tend not to enter in ARS shows images of roses with rain drops on them. In spite of all of those problems, it is a beautiful rose with great form. But, you wouldn’t show the specimen in a rose show, and if you want to show it photographically, you need to get a little creative.

As I have mentioned before, I am not fond of one-click photo editing filters that detract from the beauty of the rose. Creative Interpretation is the only class in which this image could be entered. But, I would have to change it in some way.

I spent a significant amount of time working with this image to achieve an effect I liked. I settled on this crimson/silver, which made the raindrops look like ice. This may be my Christmas card.

rose blooms

Digitally Altered for Creative Interpretation Class

Summary

If you see something visually interesting in a rose that you ordinarily would not enter as a specimen in a rose show, photograph what you find visually interesting. Then consider what you can do with it to be able to share it with others. The Creative Interpretation class allows plenty of options for showing the beauty in a bloom or rose blooms that otherwise might never be seen.

Post Script

Will I show these images as entries in a rose show? Probably not, given that I am showing them here for teaching and illustration purposes. But I would like to add that when working with rose images, I nearly always begin by cropping the digital image from the most usual digital camera ratio of 3:2 to a ratio for an 8×10 print, a 5:4 ratio. Prints ranging from 5×7 up to 8×10 are allowed by the Guidelines. For me, the 8×10 is large enough for the details to be seen the way I like for them to be seen.

Additionally, as I have pointed out previously, mounting and matting per the requirements of the Guidelines can be done by purchasing sets for this purpose in multiples of ten or more. These are available in a variety of places, but these are the ones I use:

I print my own images, and the cost to prepare an image for entry is around $3.00. Cost should not be a prohibiting factor for exhibiting your images in a rose show.

I have explained elsewhere how to easily and quickly mount and mat your images to meet specifications. For those who would like that info handy on a mobile device, it is available in Kindle form for $0.99. That is the lowest price Amazon would allow me to charge and still offer it there for convenience.

Above all, when you see something visually interesting in rose blooms, photograph them. Then consider what you might be able to do to share that with others through a photograph. And, enjoy the process!