06/9/16

Rose Gold Medal with Butterfly

Rose Gold Medal with Hair Streak Butterfly

The rose ‘Gold Medal’ has long been one of my mother’s favorites. I photographed the rose in her garden near sunset. The hair streak butterfly is from a macro shot taken in friends’ garden on a wonderful day. This image is a composite that brings together people important in my life and two gardens I love.

This image was chosen as the winner in the Judges Class of the 2015 American Rose Society Digital Photography Contest. I thank the special selection committee for that honor of an image that was already important to me for so many reasons.

rose Gold Medal ARS Photo Winner

Rose ‘Gold Medal’ with Hair Streak Butterfly

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05/18/16

Dr Huey, 2016

Dr Huey, 2016: The 3rd Annual Corrales Rose Society Dr Huey Tour

Dr Huey, know best among most rosarians as a common root-stock for grafted roses such as hybrid teas, floribundas, and many other classes of roses, may be seen in all of its own glory all over the Village of Corrales, New Mexico, for approximately one week in May. The Corrales Rose Society held its 3rd Annual Dr Huey Tour on May 15 this year, and the blooms were truly at their peak; the best overall I have ever seen them.

You may wonder why Corrales has so many of this hybrid wichurana, not usually planted for its own good qualities. Corrales sits on the river, here in the Middle Rio Grande Valley. You may recall from elementary school that “hot air rises, cold air sinks.” When I’m visiting friends in Corrales, even in the summer, if I am going to be there in the evening, I always take a jacket. Winter nights can get 10°-15°F colder than my location in Albuquerque. Corrales could be considered a “cold sink” and is just another example of one of many micro environments in the high desert.

People buy and plant grafted roses, and enjoy them as such while they are in that form. But many winters have killing freezes, often prolonged. In a desert area where winterizing of roses is rarely, if ever done, the grafted portion dies. In spring, the very hardy, alkaline-soil-thriving root-stock appears. The blooms are not at all unattractive, as you will see. People in the high desert tend to appreciate what grows and thrives, and most of these are kept. Some people keep them trimmed; some allow them to grown into their natural fountain shape; many allow them to cascade beautifully over walls; and one in particular has gotten quite huge!!!

I hope you enjoy these images as much as I enjoyed seeing the roses in person.

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05/17/16

2016 Corrales Garden Tour

2016 Corrales Garden Tour, Sunday, June 5

The 2016 Corrales Garden Tour is coming up very soon, Sunday, June 5. The information for times, as well as for pre-sale and day of tour sale are on this poster.

2016 Corrales Garden Tour

2016 Corrales Garden Tour

Gardens Fulfill Needs

Gardens answer so many desires. They are places of beauty, offering emotional and physical recharging and introspection, or a chance to share hospitality. Our gardens are the first place to act locally as we think globally about caring for the environment.

The six unique gardens on the Corrales Garden Tour on June 5, from 9AM-4PM, speak to all those needs and yearnings. Some are quietly serene and very private, others capture rain runoff and allow it to return to the soil; some have whimsical elements and a variety of seating areas. You will see gardens in the trees, others in the sandhills, and each has taken our climate and need for water conservation to heart in various ways.

Different gardens are featured each year, and the gardens are always interesting. Here is a post from last year’s tour on water features in the garden.

Six different gardens will be featured this year, and Master Gardeners will be available to answer questions. It will be a very enjoyable day.

Be sure to wear sunscreen, and it is always a good idea to have water with you.

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05/13/16

Preparing Rose Show Photographs

Preparing Rose Show Photographs – Easily, Quickly, and Cost Effectively

Preparing rose show photographs to conform to the requirements of show schedules using ARS Guidelines or the old PSWD guidelines, for example the one next week in Albuquerque, can be easy and can be done without spending a lot of money. It can also be done so that the photos hang straight and do not develop “waves” during the show.

This volume illustrates step-by-step how to mount and mat an 8×10 photo to total outside dimensions of 11×14, meeting the requirements of the old PSWD guidelines and now the National ARS Photography Guidelines. Beautifully prepare your images easily, quickly, and inexpensively.

Readable on any device (desktop, smart phone, iPad, variety of tablets, laptops) with the free Kindle app that can be downloaded at Amazon.

Susan is an American Rose Society Accredited Horticulture Judge, and in 2015 became an Accredited Arrangement Judge Emeritus. As the first PSWD Chair of Photography (2009-2012), she wrote the PSWD Photography Guidelines. She is a member of the American Rose Society Photography Committee (2012-present), chaired by Curtis Aumiller. That committee produced the first ARS Guidelines for Judging Rose Photography, approved by the ARS in 2015, now the national standard for all ARS rose shows.

The illustrated instructions offered in this Kindle volume meet the requirements of the new ARS Guidelines, as well as the requirements of the old PSWD guidelines, for those who are still using those and have not yet caught up to the ARS Guidelines.

preparing rose show photographs

Mounted and Matted for Rose Show – Gemini

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04/18/16

The New ARS Guidelines for Judging Rose Photography

Judging Rose Photography: Understanding the New ARS Guidelines

judging rose photography

Decorative Miniature Rose, ‘Cinnamon Delight’

In September 2015 the new ARS Guidelines for Judging Photography were approved and adopted by the ARS Board at the Fall Convention. These are now the Guidelines to be used for judging rose photography in shows that wish to give ARS awards. Those of you familiar with the PSWD Guidelines for Judging Rose Photography will recognize parts in the new ARS Guidelines, such as the Score Card, which is virtually unchanged. However, there are both subtle and major changes in the new ARS Guidelines, as well as additions.

I am doing a series, “Understanding the New ARS Guidelines for Judging Rose Photography” especially for those of you who know and have been using the PSWD Guidelines. For those of you who read here and at my photography website, Susan Brandt Graham Photography, you will notice the series repeats. I very much appreciate those of you who read at both sites, and the content is generally different. However, I think it is important that the new guidelines, and how they differ from and where they are the same as, the now-obsolete PSWD Guidelines, be understood by judges and all potential exhibitors. For those of you who read both places, I hope you will excuse the redundancy.

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04/11/16

Preparing Photos for Rose Shows

Preparing Photos for Rose Shows – Mounting and Matting

Preparing photos for rose shows is something people have a lot of questions about, not the least of which are cost and difficulty. As the rose show season swings into full gear, here is a how-to guide to mount and mat your 8×10 rose photographs using 11×14 backing board and mat, the usual specifications today for photography in many rose shows.

preparing photos for rose shows

Mounted and Matted for Rose Show – Gemini

This handy guide is available in e-book format at Amazon.

These are the sets of mats and backing boards I currently use for preparing my images for rose shows, and are what I recommend in the guide. They are the least expensive I have found anywhere, and they work.

More links for mounting and matting materials that meet specifications for photographs in rose shows can be found in my Amazon Associates Store. I earn from Amazon a very few cents on purchases made through links on this site.

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09/9/15

Cosmos in Corrales

Cosmos in Corrales: The Beauty of a Naturalized Landscape

Cosmos this past Labor Day weekend were spectacular in the Corrales garden of our friends Tim and Laurie. They grow many different plants, with roses being the focal point of the formal part of the garden. But, sunflowers, brown-eyed Susan, echinacea, morning glories, coreopsis, and others, have been allowed to naturalize portions of their land along the Rio Grande. All were spectacular this past weekend.

Cosmos attract many different pollinators as well as hummingbirds, goldfinches, and other birds and butterflies. The entire garden was buzzing with lively critters.

There were so many different colors and combinations in these naturalized, self reseeding annuals . This is a small sample to give a feel for the beauty of even just one kind of flower in the garden.

cosmos

Field of Cosmos

cosmos

Cosmos, Up Close

cosmos

Almost White Cosmos

This is just a very small sample of the cosmos in the landscape. They appear among a wide variety of flowers allowed to naturalize the garden space, which was spectacular in its color and beauty this past weekend.

The prolonged drought has taken its toll among many flowers. One very good adaptation to that appears to be growing a wide variety of plants. More images of different flowers growing in this beautiful space will appear later in different posts.

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08/24/15

Green June Bug

Green June Bug in August

Green June bug: although quite common here in the summer, I had never really looked at one until I caught a glimpse of something metallic blue as I took the garbage to the curb for pickup the next day. At first glance I thought maybe it was one of the metallic blue cutter bees I have seen here on roses in early spring. I got my camera, moved the dead insect out of crack in the sidewalk, and proceeded to photograph it. I had to get down on the ground to do it, and I just ignored the people who slowed down driving by who wondered what this woman was doing on the driveway.

It wasn’t until I turned it over that I realized it was a very common green June bug, a type of scarab beetle. The back view is not particularly impressive:

green June bug

Green June Bug, a scarab beetle

I had seen that view many times. It was the complexity and beauty of the underside that I had never seen before.

green June bug

Underside, Green June Bug

green June bug

Green June Bug: Beautiful in Its Complexity. “Facial” View, the Eyes Were Missing

Garden takeaway: green June bugs do not harm the garden.

Photography takeaway: you don’t always have to go looking for things to photograph; sometimes they just appear when people keep their eyes open. 🙂

Update: There are two species of Green June Bugs. The one that occurs in the West, from Texas to California (including New Mexico) may also be referred to as the Fig Beetle of Figeater Beetle. More info here. Thanks, Tim.

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08/19/15

Green Rose

Green Rose, a Hybrid China

Green Rose really is a rose. It is a sport, or a mutation, made up of sepals. Its official American Rose Society color is “white,” something of a trick question on some of the practical exams to become an ARS Accredited Horticulture Judge. I have never seen this white part, but it doesn’t matter. I enjoy having this rose in my garden.

green rose

Green Rose, a China rose, discovery in US dated circa 1827

Not only is it interesting just to look at, but rose arrangers find it useful as line material in rose arrangements.

In a previous post I mentioned the discussion among friends regarding editing of images, and the use of jpg versus raw files. Here I would like to briefly mention composition. Rule of Thirds can be a very useful composition guideline in floral photography. Those of you who read here frequently know that it is a guideline I use in a wide variety of my photography. When photographing rose sprays, however, my personal preference for my own photography is symmetry and balance. I like to show the structure of the spray, and tend to photograph sprays from that perspective, rather than from the top down. To my eye, symmetry and balance is a good way to show both the structure and beauty of rose sprays, at least in many instances. This image of the Green Rose uses symmetry and balance.

Another example is my image of Dream Weaver:

Spray of Rose Dream Weaver

Spray of rose, ‘Dream Weaver.’ Image awarded ‘Queen’ (Photography) at the ARS Fall 2014 National Convention.

Green Rose, one of the unique roses in the roses in the rose world.

Happy World Photography Day! #worldphotoday

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