05/13/16

Preparing Rose Show Photographs

Preparing Rose Show Photographs – Easily, Quickly, and Cost Effectively

Preparing rose show photographs to conform to the requirements of show schedules using ARS Guidelines or the old PSWD guidelines, for example the one next week in Albuquerque, can be easy and can be done without spending a lot of money. It can also be done so that the photos hang straight and do not develop “waves” during the show.

This volume illustrates step-by-step how to mount and mat an 8×10 photo to total outside dimensions of 11×14, meeting the requirements of the old PSWD guidelines and now the National ARS Photography Guidelines. Beautifully prepare your images easily, quickly, and inexpensively.

Readable on any device (desktop, smart phone, iPad, variety of tablets, laptops) with the free Kindle app that can be downloaded at Amazon.

Susan is an American Rose Society Accredited Horticulture Judge, and in 2015 became an Accredited Arrangement Judge Emeritus. As the first PSWD Chair of Photography (2009-2012), she wrote the PSWD Photography Guidelines. She is a member of the American Rose Society Photography Committee (2012-present), chaired by Curtis Aumiller. That committee produced the first ARS Guidelines for Judging Rose Photography, approved by the ARS in 2015, now the national standard for all ARS rose shows.

The illustrated instructions offered in this Kindle volume meet the requirements of the new ARS Guidelines, as well as the requirements of the old PSWD guidelines, for those who are still using those and have not yet caught up to the ARS Guidelines.

preparing rose show photographs

Mounted and Matted for Rose Show – Gemini

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04/18/16

The New ARS Guidelines for Judging Rose Photography

Judging Rose Photography: Understanding the New ARS Guidelines

judging rose photography

Decorative Miniature Rose, ‘Cinnamon Delight’

In September 2015 the new ARS Guidelines for Judging Photography were approved and adopted by the ARS Board at the Fall Convention. These are now the Guidelines to be used for judging rose photography in shows that wish to give ARS awards. Those of you familiar with the PSWD Guidelines for Judging Rose Photography will recognize parts in the new ARS Guidelines, such as the Score Card, which is virtually unchanged. However, there are both subtle and major changes in the new ARS Guidelines, as well as additions.

I am doing a series, “Understanding the New ARS Guidelines for Judging Rose Photography” especially for those of you who know and have been using the PSWD Guidelines. For those of you who read here and at my photography website, Susan Brandt Graham Photography, you will notice the series repeats. I very much appreciate those of you who read at both sites, and the content is generally different. However, I think it is important that the new guidelines, and how they differ from and where they are the same as, the now-obsolete PSWD Guidelines, be understood by judges and all potential exhibitors. For those of you who read both places, I hope you will excuse the redundancy.

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01/31/15
spring and roses

Dream Weaver Spray

Dream Weaver Spray – Queen of Show in Photography at ARS 2014 Fall National

Spray of Rose Dream Weaver

Spray of rose, ‘Dream Weaver.’ Image awarded ‘Queen’ at the ARS Fall 2014 National Convention.

‘Dream Weaver’ is a rose classified as a Climbing Floribunda. It can produce beautiful and large sprays.

This photograph of a Dream Weaver spray won Queen of Show in the Photography portion of the American Rose Society 2014 Fall Convention and Show. In roses, ‘Queen’ is the equivalent of ‘Best in Show.’

Many thanks to the judges for awarding this image. I especially appreciated that the judges in this national show used the Score Card for judging rose photographs developed when I served as the first Chairman of Photography in the Pacific Southwest District. When I began that task in the PSWD, it was clear that some system and uniformity was necessary. To see that used at the national level is very gratifying to me. Much less gratifying is overhearing judges instructions being given at local shows in the Pacific Southwest District where the instructions are one person’s opinion with no reference to the score card. But, that will change when only accredited rose judges are allowed to judge the rose photographs. Change may be slow, but it will happen.

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07/26/09

The Green Rose

Green Rose

Green Rose

This really is a rose, officially a China. In rose shows, it is eligible for the Genesis Award.

The cluster of green you see are really the sepals. I have been told there are true flowers deep inside the cluster of sepals; I have never seen one.

When I took the test to become an ARS Accredited Rose Judge, one of the questions was “What is the ARS color of the Green Rose?” There is no ARS color “green,” so I answered “no clue.” I think I was given partial credit for that answer.

The official color of the flowers of the Green Rose is “white.” Just some rose trivia.

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05/29/08

The American Rose Society at the Crossroads: The Cost of Gas and Other Odds and Ends

Yesterday, one of the moderators asked a great question over at Rosarians Corner; “will the cost of gasoline affect your attendance at rose shows?”

In my opinion, the American Rose Society (and probably a lot of other volunteer hobby societies) was in some trouble before the ever-increasing cost of gasoline even became an issue. But I think that additional cost is going to force the hand of many such groups in general. I will speak to the ARS only, though, because it is what I know best. This is what I wrote in response to that question:

I think your concern is valid, and those concerns have implications not just for exhibitors but also for judges, and in some ways, for the ARS.

Most of the answers here in this thread suggest that long-term exhibitors will continue to exhibit, when they have roses, no matter what the cost. That is excellent. But, will we be able to develop enough new, young exhibitors who will be able to carry on when today’s exhibitors reach an age at which they are no longer able to do so? Today’s young people are caught in a time and money crunch raising families, more often than not with a mom who works full-time to make ends meet. What, as a society, do we have to offer these people, who have lots of people and concerns competing for their time and money? What do people envision for the future of exhibiting 10 years from now? 20 years from now?

Then, there is the issue of judges for shows. I am no spring chicken, and yet I often feel like one of the younger judges at shows. Our judges are aging and dying (no point in beating around the bush, no matter how thorny!), and many wouldn’t travel more than 50 miles to judge a show even before gas prices started to soar. Will we have adequate judges to maintain the number of shows to which we have become accustomed?

Hopefully the PSWD Horticulture Judging School in Palm Springs weekend after next will produce some new apprentices. We need more up-and-coming judges willing and able to travel if we are to maintain our current number of shows.

Which brings up another point. I have heard through the grapevine, so hopefully it is not really correct, that the plan is to make the judging test harder. I cannot help but wonder what the thought process behind that is. I thought the practical portion of the horticulture judging exam was harder than any practical gross anatomy exam in medical school! If TPTB feel a different process is needed to produce better judges, fine. I can see a user-friendly mentoring process, or something of that sort, to encourage people, rather than increasing the fail rate at a time when we need to be encouraging young judges. JMHO.

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